Questions You Need to Be Asking This Week

July 09, 2018 - 3 minute read

Consumer sentiment changes every hour of every day. Knowing what customers are thinking is the key to making good decisions for your brand. Here are the top stories affecting consumers this week. Keeping your finger on the pulse, made easy. 

 

Dinner for one

Tesco is focussing more and more on people eating alone. The number of people who dine alone has been rising since the Second World War. Last year it was estimated that there are 7.7 million UK households where people want to make food just for one. In response, Tesco is moving away from the traditional UK supermarket model where bulk-buying offers and supersized packs make for better prices. For many people, these incentives hold no value, and being able to buy an appropriately-sized meal, without risking contributing to Britain's colossal food waste, is a more attractive prospect. Tesco now counts 430 products among its single-serve range, up 40% from last year.

If you get the feeling your offering’s not up to the minute in terms of what consumers really want, why not ask:
When you’re buying [product], how long do you expect it to last you?
Do you find that you always use up [product], or do you find yourself throwing it away?
How many times a week do you buy [product]?

Use these results to reassess the size and quantity you ought to be selling your products in to maximise convenience.

 

Sponsorship shifts

The world of sport is dominating the news this week. With many of us in delighted shock that England are one of only four teams left in the World Cup, and Wimbledon underway, there’s much sport to be keeping us hooked to our TV. And since the eyes of the world are glued to athletes, it’s a great chance for brands to show off their wares. Nike has reported soaring sales—revenues rose by 13% to $9.8bn this year. This comes despite the brand being dropped by one of their most famous brand ambassadors: Roger Federer. Federer stepped out to play his first Wimbledon match wearing Uniqlo, after he signed a contract worth a reported $300m. Federer joins Japanese tennis player Kei Nishikori and Australian golfer Adam Scott on Uniqlo’s roster.

If you’re looking for an influencer that’s going to hit home with fans, why not ask your consumers:
Which celebrity do you think epitomises [brand]?
Which famous person has impressed you in the last six months?

Use these results to work out who’s resonating with your brand image, to get your sponsorship deals on point.

 

Let’s get electric

The government is preparing to legislate for the mass arrival of electric cars. The transport secretary, Chris Grayling, has proposed that new-build homes and new street lights should all be fitted with electric car charging points. Ministers would also like to impose a ban by 2040 on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars. Not only will the UK’s pollution levels benefit, but the changes will also open up a brand new slice of the car market. With Toyota now specialising in hybrid petrol/electric vehicles, and Tesla innovating in the electric engine space, brands need to be gearing up for the change and the new possibilities of road travel.

If you’re looking to take advantage of this new market, why not ask people:
How often do you buy a new car?
What type of schemes could incentivise you to buy a new hybrid/electric car sooner?
If you own an electric car, what’s your one biggest frustration with charging it?

Use these results to work out how you could bring people over to the electric way of life.

 

Another one bites the dust

One more high street retailer joins the ever-lengthening list of brands forced to close stores. Mothercare has announced that it will be closing 60 stores by 2019, putting 900 jobs at risk. Despite raising £32.5m from existing shareholders, competition from supermarkets, Amazon, and specialist online baby retailers has left its finances in an untenable situation.

Kate Hardcastle, a retail consultant, said the brand had failed because “it lost touch with mums.” She cited poorly trained sales assistants, unable to help with concerns about upcoming parenthood and products, as the main issue.

If you’re concerned that your brand’s not meeting the needs of its target consumer, ask people:
What product do you come into our store for most frequently?
When you’re shopping with us, how much do you value the advice of sales assistants?
Do you feel sales assistants in our stores understand your needs?

Use these results to be sure that there’s no chinks the consumers’ pathway from browsing to buying. If your sales team aren’t up to scratch, make sure their retraining programme puts your target consumers’ needs at its centre.

 

If you want to launch a survey about any of these, or other current issues, just log in to your Attest dashboard and launch a survey to find out what real people are thinking right now. 

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