How Work.Life used data to create happier workspaces

Co-working brand Work.Life found itself up against some pretty serious competition. Find out how they used the 'Learn' stage of the Growth Cycle to boost their marketing ROI and build a Performance Brand.

For decades, brand and performance marketing have been uneasy bedfellows. But as most companies embrace the necessity to engage with both disciplines well, there is untapped potential in applying the principles of performance marketing to brand building. 

Here at Attest, we’ve (literally) written the book on how to bridge the divide between performance and brand marketing. In it, we unveil our handy framework, distilled into four stages, to building a true performance brand. We like to call it the ‘growth cycle’ – comprised of the distinct areas of ‘learn’, ‘validate’, ‘reach’, and ‘measure’. 

The ‘learn’ stage of the growth cycle

‘Learn’ is the first stage of the Growth Cycle, and it’s all about getting a good understanding of your target audience. Just like when you plan a marketing campaign, it’s essential that you start with a solid knowledge of the people you’re marketing to – and the same goes for building a successful brand. 

If you don’t really know who your ideal consumer or customer is, you can use consumer profiling to find out. If you already have an idea, maybe you’d start to segment your audience out into different groups. And if you’ve got an audience that you want to know more about, you apply a classic framework (like Jobs To Be Done) or analyse market trends to understand the shifting landscape of your category. 

So, how is the Learn stage applied to building a high-performing brand? We asked marketing leaders across a range of industries and compiled their experience into our book. 

Want to get your hands on the complete book? Download it for free below…

The performance brand

This trailblazing book explores the untapped potential of applying performance marketing principles to brand building, including 15 case studies from leading brands.

Get your copy now

How Work.Life used data to create happier workspaces


Work.Life is a brand that provides co-working space. As a relatively young company, they found themselves going up against some big players as the industry began to grow – and with stronger competition came a stronger need to understand what set Work.Life apart from the rest. 

By taking the time to survey their past and current members, Work.Life uncovered valuable insights that would go on to form their USPs. Their customers cared about more than just having a practical space – they cared about creating happy teams. 

The team used their learnings to evolve the Work.Life brand’s purpose, key messaging, and even the services they provide in their workspaces. As Sarah put it:

“Becoming a thought leader in workplace happiness and wellbeing was one of our goals. Surveys showed our spaces were on the right path, but we wanted to go beyond our offices.”

Work.Life ended up starting a podcast and event series called ‘Work Happy’, tailor-made for their audience of business leaders and HR professionals who cared about wellbeing at work. The podcast achieved over 12,000 listens, the events brought hundreds of engaged business owners into the Work.Life workspaces, and their database grew accordingly – with all of that success attributed to one key learning.

Work.Life aren’t the only brand who’ve used insight to drive business growth. You’ll find even more examples for each stage of the Growth Cycle in our book, The Performance Brand – get a free copy below…

The performance brand

This trailblazing book explores the untapped potential of applying performance marketing principles to brand building, including 15 case studies from leading brands.

Get your copy now

Taylor Revert

Senior Content Marketing Executive 

Taylor’s bread and butter is creating value-adding content in all of its forms. She’s a bit of a tech geek, gets hyped about marketing science, and will rarely be sighted without a cup of tea in hand. She’s also Coeliac - so make that bread and butter gluten-free.

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